How to Answer Conflict-Resolution Interview Questions

August 2nd, 2021 by Staff

By DANIEL BORTZ – Monster.com contributor

 

There are different types of conflict at work, but your reactions should always showcase a diplomatic approach.

No one likes conflict, especially at work. But disagreements between co-workers are inevitable—and showing prospective employers that you’re well versed in conflict resolution is crucial. Will you add to the melee or can you step back and remain levelheaded?

Obviously, not everything in your career is going to be easy, whether that means confronting the person who stole your lunch from the office refrigerator to negotiating a new contract with clients to deliberating a new job offer. In an environment that’s diverse as the modern workplace there are going to be differences of opinion and behavior. Employers need to be sure you can get along well with others.

Conflict resolution is just one of the many hurdles the workplace will present to you. Here are five common questions hiring managers ask to assess your conflict-resolution skills and the best approach to answering them.

QUESTION 1: How do you deal with conflict?
People aren’t going to get along with each other all the time. It’s just a fact. Employers want to know that you can respond to conflict diplomatically. If you’re a my-way-or-the-highway type of personality, you’re not going to get very far in the interview.

Start off by emphasizing communication and respectfulness as a means to conflict resolution. For example, “I always take the person aside and discuss the issue privately. I listen actively to make sure I understand the other person’s point of view, and I work with the person to develop a solution together.” Stress that even if you both don’t completely agree on the end result, you tried to at least meet each other halfway.

QUESTION 2: Tell me about a time when you had an issue with a co-worker
This a behavioral interview question—meaning you should take it as an opportunity to share a success story about how you resolved an issue with a co-worker in the past. You want to make sure to choose an incident where you and your co-worker were able to resolve the issue among yourselves, without having to involve your boss or other higher-ups. Showcase your competence in problem solving.

Focus your answer on the facts rather than blaming the other person. Instead of saying, “Jim was such a slacker,” simply explain the situation and what steps you took to solve the problem: “On at least three occasions, Jim missed deadlines that pushed back our production schedule. After I discussed this with him, we found a way to improve the workflow system together.”

QUESTION 3: Tell me about a time when you disagreed with your boss
Tread carefully here. (And yes, we know that can be difficult.)

To set a positive tone, begin your response by acknowledging the difficulty of the situation: “It’s not easy to confront your manager, but I’ve learned that it has to be done some times.”

Then choose an anecdote that shows you respected your boss’ opinion: “When my boss suggested we change our sales pitch to new clients, we figured out what wasn’t working and created a new strategy together.”

QUESTION 4: How do you deal with differences of opinion when working on a team?
Conflict resolution is often a team effort. It’s not always easy to see eye to eye with co-workers, but that’s not a good reason to discount their contributions. No surprise many employers seek job candidates who demonstrate strong teamwork skills.

Hiring managers want to hear that you value diversity of opinion and understand how different points of view can contribute to a better solution than if everyone just immediately agreed with each other.

As such, your response to this question should point out that you welcome alternate perspectives: “I always appreciate different viewpoints from my own. When someone expresses a different opinion, I listen carefully to what the person says and utilize that feedback.”

QUESTION 5: Tell me about a time you had to respond to an unhappy customer or client
When you’re interviewing for a client- or customer-facing position, you’re applying to be an ambassador for the company and that type of role carries a lot of responsibility.

Especially in the age of the internet, how you respond to conflicts with a customer is a public matter. Losing a major client or customer can cost the company a lot of money. Show that you’re willing to go the extra mile to make customers or clients happy. This demonstrates that you understand the value of customer service.

As with other behavioral interview questions, your anecdote should focus on the positive outcome: “Here was how I de-escalated the situation and kept the client happy going forward.”

Show hiring managers that you aren’t nursing an overblown ego and are eager to embrace a peacekeeping process. Not only can this type of attitude serve you well in the workplace, but it can also improve non-working relationships as well.

Conflict Resolution Will Serve You Well
Learning how to peacefully coexist with your colleagues will take you far. Want to learn more expert insights to succeed at work? Monster can send you free career advice and job search tips so you can learn how to stay cool when the pressure inevitably mounts.

 

FULL ARTICLE AVAILABLE HERE: https://www.monster.com/career-advice/article/conflict-resolution-questions


Genie Matthews Ranked 10th of 1400+ NPAworldwide Recruiters

April 22nd, 2021 by Staff

We are proud to announce that Genie Matthews, President and Sr. Recruiter of Genie Matthews & Associates, has been named as the #10 Recruiter on this year’s NPAworldwide Top 25 Recruiters list! The awards were presented recently at the NPAworldwide Global Conference.

 

In addition to Genie’s individual award, Genie Matthews & Associates continues to be recognized as a Top 25 Recruiting Firm – ranking 16th overall this year.

 

Ranked among more than 1400 recruiters and 500 firms by the NPAworldwide Board of Directors, Genie Matthews & Associates continues a long-standing tradition of excelling in this prestigious network of recruiting partners.

 

Connect with our award-winning recruiting firm today, and let us put our experience to work for you!


2021 Engineering Salary Statistics

January 22nd, 2021 by Staff

Engineers Get Top Pay

What is an engineering degree worth? Year after year, engineering jobs are paid the highest average starting salary. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) engineers have a median annual wage of $91,010 and the engineering field projects to have employment growth of nearly 140,000 new jobs over the next decade. The bottom line: it is well worth the time and effort it takes to become an engineer. So how much do engineers make?

Industry BLS Stats Mean Entry-Level Salary1 Mean Annual Salary2 Top 10 Percent3
Biomedical Engineering National Labor Stats $61,920 $97,090 $148,210
Chemical Engineering National Labor Stats $67,527 $117,090 $176,090
Civil Engineering National Labor Stats $58,190 $94,360 $144,560
Computer Engineering Computer Hardware Engineers

Software Developers, Systems Software

$73,110

$70,115

$123,030

$111,620

$185,240

$164,590

Construction Management National Labor Stats $57,060 $105,000 $164,790
Electrical Engineering National Labor Stats $66,925 $103,480 $155,880
Environmental Engineering National Labor Stats $57,336 $94,220 $142,070
Electrical Engineering Technology / Mechatronics Recruiter $86,6904 $133,2804
Geological and Mining Engineering and Sciences National Labor Stats $69,879 $96,990 $151,230
Geospatial Science and Technology National Labor Stats $56,003 $69,790 $103,380
Materials Science and Engineering National Labor Stats $67,303 $97,890 $148,960
Mechanical Engineering National Labor Stats $63,055 $93,540 $138,020
Mechanical Engineering Technology National Labor Stats $99,310 $154,720
Surveying Engineering National Labor Stats $32,178 $67,920 $104,850

1: Figures from payscale.com, January 2021
2, 3: Figures from National Occupational Employment and Wage Estimates, United States Department of Labor, January 2021
4: Mechatronics figures from Recruiter.com for Private Sector, January 2021

 

FULL ARTICLE AVAILABLE HERE: https://www.mtu.edu/engineering/outreach/welcome/salary/

 

 


5 Tips for Explaining Gaps in Your Employment History

May 20th, 2020 by Staff

There’s a misconception that it’s a red flag to recruiters if they see breaks in employment on a résumé. Job seekers tend to assume that companies prefer candidates with work experience that seamlessly flows from one employer to the next; many people worry about how to explain common occurrences such as being laid off, quitting a bad job before having a new one, taking an extended family leave or experiencing a personal emergency that temporarily takes them out of the workforce.

However, recruiters are used to dealing with candidates in these situations and rarely is it a cause for concern. It isn’t the break in employment that hurts a candidate’s chances at landing their next job, it’s often how they choose to describe the situation that mistakenly creates a negative perception of their temperament or abilities.

If you find yourself conducting a job search while unemployed or needing to answer questions about a previous gap in your employment, here are five tips to help you comfortably discuss your time out of the workforce and cast it in the best possible light.

1. Assume that recruiters have good intentions

Asking about why you are currently looking for a new job or inquiring about a gap in the years on your résumé is a routine practice for recruiters. They aren’t trying to uncover hidden secrets; they are simply making sure they can answer any questions about your background that may be asked of them later.

Recruiters are selective and do want to find and assess the best talent for their company or client, but that doesn’t stop them from hoping you’ll turn out to be a good match. When you prove yourself to be a strong candidate it saves them time and relieves some of the pressure to keep searching. If a recruiter wants to have a screening call or video interview with you, assume that they are genuinely interested in your background and are hoping that you are a fit.

2. Leverage familiar narratives

Most of the reasons that people find themselves unemployed are extremely common and can be explained quickly because recruiters and hiring managers are already familiar with the narrative.

Some examples of the kind of career disruptions employers run into again and again are: if you were laid off because it was (fill in the blank year when the economy was terrible or something bad happened in your industry), if a new CEO (or another senior leader) came in and replaced your entire team, or if your company was acquired, merged with another or went out of business. Employers also understand disruptions that are more personal, such as if you took time off to be a full-time parent, if you tried to launch a start-up but decided it wasn’t for you, if you or another family member had some medical concerns that needed to be addressed, or if your spouse’s career required a relocation.

These are the easiest explanations to give about an employment gap so if any of these situations apply to you, make sure you are simply presenting the recruiter with what is already a known and valid reason to be out of work. Don’t go into any additional detail about your departure or time off unless asked because there is a good chance that using one of these descriptions will be enough to satisfy their curiosity.

3. Be honest, but keep it light and positive

While everything you say in an interview needs to be genuine and accurate, it is not the place to share your most vulnerable stories. Recruiters and hiring managers don’t know you well enough yet to see your career journey and to appreciate what you have endured and learned.

Still…

To finish reading the full article by Kourtney Whitehead, go to: https://www.forbes.com/sites/kourtneywhitehead/2020/05/11/5-tips-on-how-to-explain-gaps-in-your-employment-history/#3324786f7fb5


Engineers Get Top Pay

December 2nd, 2019 by Staff

Engineers Get Top Pay

What is an engineering degree worth? Year after year, engineering jobs are paid the highest average starting salary. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) engineers have a median annual wage of $91,010 and the engineering field projects to have employment growth of nearly 140,000 new jobs over the next decade. The bottom line: it is well worth the time and effort it takes to become an engineer. So how much do engineers make?

Industry BLS Stats Mean Entry-Level Salary1 Mean Annual Salary2 Top 10 Percent3
Biomedical Engineering National Labor Stats $60,958 $95,090 $144,350
Chemical Engineering National Labor Stats $65,618 $114,470 $169,770
Civil Engineering National Labor Stats $56,152 $93,720 $142,560
Computer Engineering Computer Hardware Engineers

Software Developers, Systems Software

$71,007

$68,436

$117,840

$114,000

$172,630

$166,960

Construction Management National Labor Stats $55,795 $103,110 $161,510
Electrical Engineering National Labor Stats $64,936 $101,600 $153,240
Environmental Engineering National Labor Stats $55,884 $92,640 $137,090
Electrical Engineering Technology / Mechatronics Recruiter $86,6904 $133,2804
Geological and Mining Engineering and Sciences National Labor Stats $61,977 $98,420 $151,030
Geospatial Science and Technology National Labor Stats $49,571 $68,340 $101,400
Materials Science and Engineering National Labor Stats $65,806 $96,930 $148,110
Mechanical Engineering National Labor Stats $61,538 $92,800 $136,550
Mechanical Engineering Technology National Labor Stats $44,274 $58,240 $85,430
Surveying Engineering National Labor Stats $48,360 $66,440 $102,220

1: Figures from payscale.com, October 2019
2, 3: Figures from National Occupational Employment and Wage Estimates, United States Department of Labor, October 2019
4: Mechatronics Figures from Recruiter.com for Private Sector, October 2019

Full article available here: https://www.mtu.edu/engineering/outreach/welcome/salary/


10 Résumé Tips to Impress a Recruiter in 7 Seconds

November 18th, 2019 by Staff

BY JULIA MALACOFF — GLASSDOOR

Having a well-crafted résumé can be the key to getting your foot in the door at the company of your dreams. But figuring out how to make your résumé fully representative of your experience and also stand out is easier said than done. After all, hiring managers and recruiters generally only spend about seven seconds reading your résumé before deciding whether to move forward or not. Most people know the basics of how to put together a decent work history, but here are some tips you probably haven’t heard before that can help your résumé stand up to the seven-second test.

1. ONLY INCLUDE YOUR ADDRESS IF IT WORKS IN YOUR FAVOR

If you’re applying for positions in the city or town you already live in, then go ahead and include your address. In this case, it lets the hiring manager know you’re already in the area and could theoretically start working right away.

But if you’re targeting jobs in another area and you’d need to move in order to start working, it’s probably a good idea to leave your current address off of your résumé. Why? Recruiters are sometimes less excited to interview candidates from another city or state, since they often require relocation fees.

2. BE A NAME-DROPPER

It may be poor form to drop names in everyday life, but you absolutely should do it on your résumé. If you’ve worked with well-known clients or companies, go ahead and include them by name. Something like: “Closed deals with Google, Toyota, and Bank of America” will get recruiters’ attention in no time flat.

3. UTILIZE YOUR PERFORMANCE REVIEWS

You might not think to look to your annual review for résumé material, but checking out the positive feedback you’ve received in years past can help you identify your most noteworthy accomplishments and best work attributes—two things that should definitely be highlighted on your résumé. Including specific feedback you’ve received and goals you’ve met can help you avoid needing to use “fluff” to fill out your work experience.

4. DON’T GO OVERBOARD WITH KEYWORDS

Many companies and recruiters use keyword-scanning software as a tool to narrow the job applicant pool. For this reason, it’s important to include keywords from the job description in your résumé—but don’t go overboard. Recruiters can spot “keyword stuffing” a mile away.

5. USE COMMON SENSE EMAIL ETIQUETTE

There are two types of email addresses you shouldn’t use on your résumé or when applying to a job via email: your current work email address, or an overly personal or inappropriate email address, like loverguy22@gmail.com. Stick with something professional based on your name in order to make the best possible impression.

6. WHEN IT COMES TO SKILLS, QUALITY OVER QUANTITY

There’s no need to list skills that most people in the job market have (Think: Microsoft Office, email, Mac, and PC proficient), which can make it look like you’re just trying to fill up space on the page. Keep your skills section short, and only include impactful skills that are relevant to the job you’re applying to.

7. CHOOSE TO SHARE SOCIAL ACCOUNTS STRATEGICALLY

Including links to social media accounts on a résumé is becoming more and more common. But it’s important to distinguish between professional accounts—like a LinkedIn profile or Instagram account you manage for work—and nonprofessional ones, like your personal Twitter or Facebook account. While it might be tempting to include a personal account in order to show recruiters who you are, you’re better off only listing accounts that are professionally focused. Save your winning personality for an in-person interview.

8. USE HOBBIES TO YOUR ADVANTAGE

Not all hobbies deserve a place on your résumé, but some do. Hobbies that highlight positive personality qualities or skills that could benefit you on the job are worth including. For example, running marathons (shows discipline and determination) and blogging about something related to your field (shows creativity and genuine interest in your work) are hobbies that will cast you in the best possible light and might pique a recruiter’s interest.

9. SKIP GENERIC DESCRIPTORS

Hardworking, self-motivated, self-sufficient, proactive, and detail-oriented are all words you’ll find on most people’s résumés. But most job seekers are motivated and hardworking, so these traits don’t really set you apart from the rest of the applicant pool. Instead, focus on the specific skills and accomplishments that make you different from everyone else applying to the position.

10. KEEP AN ACCOMPLISHMENT JOURNAL

Keeping a log of your work accomplishments and positive feedback as they come up can make putting together or updating your résumé significantly easier. Include as many details as possible so you don’t have to spend time tracking them down later.

 

READ THE FULL ORIGINAL ARTICLE HERE: https://www.fastcompany.com/90399431/10-resume-tips-to-impress-a-recruiter-in-7-seconds


How to Adjust After Relocating for a Job

September 6th, 2019 by Staff

How to Adjust After Relocating for a Job by Lisa Evans

Uprooting your life and starting a new job is overwhelming. Here are a few steps to make the transition easier.

Starting a new job is stressful enough, but add moving to a new city on top of it, and it’s easy to feel overwhelmed. Relocating for work is a huge adjustment both personally and professionally. Not only are you getting a new set of coworkers and a new corporate culture, you’re also getting a new commute, a new home, and if you’re moving with a family, you’re faced with a host of other challenges, including navigating a new school system and finding childcare.

Here are some tips to help you get through the change.

BE A TOURIST IN YOUR NEW CITY
If you’re relocating strictly for a job, it’s likely that you don’t know a whole lot about the place you’re moving to. While you can find out a lot about your new city online before moving, spend some time once there to explore like a tourist. Take a walk around your neighborhood to find the best local cafés, and explore local landmarks. Then get used to the local life, locating your nearest grocery store and getting familiar with your route to and from work. The more familiar you become with your new physical environment, the more comfortable you’ll begin to feel in your new home.

KEEP YOUR LIFE SIMPLE
Getting to know your new colleagues and your new corporate culture takes a lot of energy. Add that to getting to know your new city, and it’s easy to feel overwhelmed. “Simple things like figuring out how to navigate the subway system or deciding which supermarket you want to shop at can zap your energy very quickly,” says career change and business coach Avery Roth. She recommends simplifying your life for a few months while you get your bearings. Avoid overloading your schedule with social events or commitments while you focus on establishing a work-life routine in your new city.

MAINTAIN YOUR FAMILIAR ROUTINE
Maintaining familiar aspects of your routine from your home city can help you adjust to your new surroundings. If you’re used to going to a yoga class twice a week, finding a new studio and keeping up with this routine can help you balance out the big changes you’re experiencing.

SAY YES TO NEW OPPORTUNITIES
Moving to a new city and being surrounded by people who don’t know you means you have a unique opportunity to reinvent yourself, or to discover who you are as a person who lives in your new town. You may be invited to try things you didn’t have the opportunity to do before. Saying yes to these opportunities can help you branch out and discover who you are as a resident of your new city.

 

READ THE FULL ORIGINAL ARTICLE HERE:

https://www.fastcompany.com/90294972/how-to-adjust-after-relocating-for-a-job


We’re Celebrating 25 Years!

April 4th, 2019 by Staff

Genie Matthews and Associates is proud to announce their recognition by National Personnel Associates (NPAWorldwide) for their 25 year tenure with the worldwide recruiting firm.   Genie Matthews and Associates offers professional recruiting services with a focus on technical management, engineering, and professional assignments in the chemical process, petrochemicals, pharmaceuticals, biotech, mining, fibers/resins, agrochemicals, and related industries.   Connect with us today and put our experience to work for you!

Visit us anytime here:  http://www.gmarecruiters.com

View our jobs here:  https://www.gmarecruiters.com/jobs/

#NPAWorldwide

 


Chemical Industry Soars!

April 4th, 2019 by Staff

Economic growth in the United States remained dynamic at the end of 2018 with gains in manufacturing double what they were a year ago. However, all the world’s other major economies have slowed, ending a rare period of synchronized expansion.

In the United States, business investment is on the rise and domestic oil and natural gas production continue to reach new heights. Improvement in major end-use markets is setting the stage for gains in U.S chemical production during 2019. U.S. chemical manufacturers remain advantaged, with access to cheaper and more abundant feedstock and energy. This has resulted in sizable capital investment in U.S. chemical production capacity. As these investments…..

Read the entire article here:  https://www.chemicalprocessing.com/articles/2019/strong-outlook-bolsters-u-s-chemical-industry/

 


USA a bright spot for chemical businesses

March 27th, 2019 by Staff

The US, in contrast to Europe, will be a bright spot. There, the cumulative power of spending and investment since the 2008 recession will keep factories humming, and that’s that’s good news for chemical businesses. “The industry is poised for significant growth in output. It’s a very promising outlook,” says Kevin Swift, chief economist at the American Chemistry Council (ACC), a trade group for US chemical makers.

High demand for chemicals used in manufacturing will dovetail with a rise in production capacity as new chemical facilities open to take advantage of the shale gas boom, Swift points out. The ACC projects that US chemical output, excluding pharmaceuticals, will rise 3.6% this year, up from an already vigorous 3.1% in 2018.

The biggest factor driving US demand for chemicals is consumer spending. Thanks mainly to job growth, consumer confidence remains at historically high levels. Even jobs in the chemical sector are multiplying after decades of erosion. And continued low unemployment is expected to finally push up wages this year.

Read the entire article here:  https://cen.acs.org/business/World-Chemical-Outlook-2019-Around-the-globe/97/i2