Forbes has honored Genie Matthews and Associates

May 26th, 2017 by Staff

Forbes has announced the first ever Best Executive Search Firms in the U.S., and Genie Matthews & Associates is one of these incredible firms! Forbes collaborated Statista to release this first annual, highly exclusive America’s Best Executive Search Firms 2017 List.

The U.S. is chock-full of Executive Search firms, and they all claim expertise, but only the greatest have the right to be called one of Forbes America’s Best.   Connect with us today and see what we can do for you.

Read more or see the full list here:  https://www.forbes.com/best-executive-recruiting-firms/list/#tab:overall.


9 clear signs it’s time to quit your job

May 17th, 2017 by Staff

If you’re like most people, you spend more of your valuable waking hours at work than you do anywhere else. It’s critical that you spend your time at the right company, pursuing the right opportunity.

Bad management does not discriminate based on salary or job title. A Fortune 500 executive team can experience more dissatisfaction and turnover than the baristas at a local coffee shop. The more demanding your job is and the less control you have over what you do, the more likely you are to suffer. A study by the American Psychological Association found that people whose work meets both these criteria are more likely to experience exhaustion, poor sleep, anxiety, and depression.

Staying in a bad job for too long can be very harmful to your career. If you’ve tried everything you can think of to make things better and haven’t seen any big changes, it may be time to move on.

 Choosing to leave a job can be a gut-wrenching decision. You need to know that you’re making the right choice. The good news is there are some clear signs that, if you experience enough of them, suggest it’s time to move on.

The company is circling the drain

A recent study showed that 71 percent of small businesses close their doors by their tenth year in operation. If you’re worried about your company’s health, there’s a good chance you’re right. Watch for clues, like suddenly needing management approval for even minor expenses, an increase in closed-door meetings, or an increased number of upper-management departures. If you suspect that the business is in trouble, it may be time to leave. If you wait until the company closes, you’ll be in the job market competing against your former co-workers.

There’s no room for advancement

It’s easy to get stuck in a job, and, if you love what you’re doing, getting stuck can be comfortable. However, it’s important to remember that every job should enhance your skills and add to your value as an employee. If you’re not learning anything new and are just puttering around doing the same old thing while people around you get promotions and plum assignments, it’s time to look elsewhere.

You’re out of the loop

Does it seem like you’re always the last one to hear about what’s going on at work? If you’re left out of meetings, rarely get face time with upper management, and have never even heard of the big project everyone else is so excited about, that could mean that your bosses just see you as a body filling a desk, rather than as a valuable contributor. That’s bad news for your career and may mean it’s time to leave.

Read more:     https://www.theladders.com/p/16231/9-clear-signs-its-time-to-quit-your-job

 

This post originally appeared on LinkedIn.

Dr. Travis Bradberry is the coauthor of Emotional Intelligence 2.0 and the cofounder of TalentSmart.


Genie Matthews & Associates named in NPA’s Top 25 Firms for 2016

April 17th, 2017 by Staff

One of the highlights of the NPA Global Conference each year is recognizing the top-performing firms and recruiters within the network and this year was no exception. In addition to presenting the Chairman’s Award, the Top 25 Firms were recognized.  Genie Matthews & Associates  ranked #16 in overall rankings among hundreds of firms, continuing a long standing tradition of placing within the Top 25 Firms of this prestigious network of recruiting affiliates.   Let our experience work for you!  Contact us today.


Kathy Cardenas has joined the GMA Group

March 24th, 2017 by Staff

Genie Matthews and Associates is happy to announce the affiliation of Senior Recruiter, Kathy Cardenas.  Kathy has over 19+ years of professional staffing and full cycle recruiting experience. Successfully recruiting engineering, financial and other facets of manufacturing personnel such as; HS&E (engineers, leaders and managers), specialty chemicals, engineering leaders and managers, maintenance engineers, reliability engineers, quality engineers, HR (generalist, managers & directors), and corporate and plant level Finance personnel.   Kathy was previously an RPO Senior Recruiter at Honeywell, an international supplier of process technology, aviation, specialty chemicals, Building supplies, products, engineering services, petrochemicals and Oil & Gas.   Kathy also successfully managed a branch location for Adecco.

Put Kathy’s expertise to work for you today. Contact her at kathy.cardenas@gmarecruiters.com or 850-637-8763


29 Tough Job Interview Questions and Answers

January 20th, 2017 by Staff

How to Answer Some of the Toughest Questions to Get the Job

There are the basic interview questions that almost every hiring manager asks. There are also interview questions that are more of a challenge to answer. These tougher questions give the interviewer a deeper sense of who you are and whether you’re a good fit for the company.

Some are trick questions and others are designed to put you on the spot to see how you react. There are also those that don’t have a right or wrong answer.

Here are some of the toughest interview questions that employers ask, along with advice on how to respond and sample answers.

Personality Questions

Preparing for an interview is a good chance to reexamine yourself because the interviewer wants to see what type of personality you have. These questions get to that core and dig into who you are on a personal level.

The “Weakness” Questions

Ah, the “What is your greatest weakness?” questions! They are painful but interviewers love to ask them and you need to be ready with a good answer. They want you to be honest, but you don’t have to dig into your dark past or reveal everything.

There is a good and a bad way to answer these questions.

 One thing is for sure, you should never say, “I don’t have any.”

Previous Work Questions

Employers want to get a feel for how you handle workplace situations and what you think of your colleagues.

Try not to say many negative things and if you do, put a positive spin on it. You don’t want to look like a whiner or that guy in the office who can’t get along with anyone!

The “Why Are You Leaving” Questions

Questions about why you are looking for work are among the toughest you will face, particularly if the circumstances are less than positive. An honest, well-thought out answer can get you through this round of questioning.

Ending on a positive note or showing a new direction in your life can turn a negative experience around. Be confident in this answer.

Tough “On the Job” Questions

This round of questions is trying to probe for how you would work in the company’s environment. Each workplace is different and they have expectations of their employees, but honest answers can help bridge any gaps.

Tricky Interview Questions

You will need to put a little thought into answering these and they’re just a few examples of tricky questions. Many times, the interviewer wants to see how well you respond to changing environments and how fast you can think on your feet.

Be prepared with a few answers to the most common questions but be ready for something totally off the wall. If you need to, repeat the question as you come up with an answer. It’s a great trick because it gives you time to think.

What to Do if You Don’t Have an Answer

Sometimes, despite doing all the preparation you can for an interview you just don’t have an answer or can’t think of something to say right away. Don’t panic! Here’s what to do when you can’t answer an interview question.

 

Read more at https://www.thebalance.com/tough-interview-question-answers-2061233


7 Facts Recruiters Look for in Your Resume or CV

August 9th, 2016 by Staff

Most business decisions are based on hard cold facts, and hiring decisions are no different. If an organisation is going to invest time and money into employing you; they will need to see evidence that you can perform.

By now we all know that clichés and buzzwords do nothing to impress recruiters, but many candidates still do not fully understand which facts are sought in a CV. When writing your role descriptions in particular; you should put yourself in the hiring manager’s shoes and think about the evidence you would require to make an informed hiring decision. Including the following details in your CV’s role descriptions will provide clarity to recruiters and support the case for interviewing and eventually hiring you.

1. Your position in the hierarchy

If a hiring manager is going to bring you on board, then it’s crucial for them to understand where they can place you within their team. Whether you are sitting at the top of the pile and overseeing largescale operations; leading a small team or working independently with nobody under your management; you need to make your position clear. Be sure to describe who you report to, whether you manage anybody and which people are dependent on you.

2. Who you interact with

Human interaction plays a vital role in the running of any organisation, so hiring managers will need to be satisfied that you are comfortable dealing with people. Most jobs will require you to interact with a wide range of individuals, so your CV should demonstrate you are capable of this. Show exactly who you interact with from customers and suppliers to management and external regulators; to prove your business-social abilities. Evidence that you can build strong working relationships, and use them to create beneficial outcomes for your employers.

3. Technology expertise

Technology is used in every line of work; from computer based tools like programming languages and accountancy software, through to hardware such as production machinery and vehicles. Most roles will require some working knowledge of one or more tools, so employers will be keen to understand your ability to use their core systems and hardware. So whether you’re an expert coder or a sports car technician, it’s essential to detail the tools you are able to use and how you apply them within your roles.

4. Work Produced

The work that you produce will vary greatly depending on your industry.  It could be anything from Excel reports or website pages, to physical products like mobile phones or even buildings. Whatever tangible work you produce within your own roles, include it within your CV and be clear on the volumes you have produced, quality of the work, and how valuable they are to your customers or internal dependents.

5. What your employer actually does

This may seem obvious, but a surprisingly few candidates include a sufficient explanation of their employers. Before you delve into the specifics of your roles, it’s important that the recruiter understands who you work for and what they do. Without building context around your role, it will be difficult for readers to fully understand your work. However the level of detail you need to include will vary depending on the organisation.

If you work for relatively small business, it’s less likely that recruiters will have heard of them; so you will need to provide a full explanation of the services they offer and markets they operate in. However if you work for a household brand then you will need to place more focus on describing the department you work in, and how it’s function contributes to the success of the wider business.

6. The objective of your roles

The most important aspect that recruiters will want to know about your previous jobs, is what were you hired to do? It’s all well and good writing a detailed list of your daily activities, meetings and presentations; but without outlining the high level purpose of your role, nobody will understand what all your hard work was for. Every role should start with a clear objective statement so that readers can comprehend the bigger picture of your duties.

7. Numbers

Recruiters will look for numbers in your CV as a means of quantifying your value to an employer. Figures can provide strong evidence of the return on investment that an employer can expect after hiring you. For example, if you can provide some statistics around revenue that you’ve generated for a firm, or the value of a project you have supported, they are a great way to demonstrate your value. But the figures do not always have to be monetary; you can include figures such as; percentages of targets achieved or time taken to deliver a piece of work.

By including some of the facts above in your own CV role descriptions, you will prove your worth to recruiters and greatly increase your chances of landing job interviews.

Originally published at http://theundercoverrecruiter.com/recruiters-facts-cv/?utm_source=UR+Recap+28%2F7%2F2016&utm_campaign=URRecap+28%2F7%2F2016&utm_medium=email

 

 


Mindset Matters

June 9th, 2016 by Staff

Like many fans of HBO’s comedy Silicon Valley, I love that the show so accurately depicts life in the high-technology industry. A few episodes depict a mindset and experience common among in-demand candidates. When I see it on the screen, it’s entertainment. When I encounter it in my recruiting, it’s challenging.

The “I’m Hot” Mindset

Nelson “Big Head” Bighetti is the close friend of the show’s main character, Richard Hendricks. After Richard’s file-compression startup, Pied Piper, starts attracting high-profile venture capital, there are discussions about whether Big Head — a likable fellow but an average-at-best programmer — would get to stay on with the company. The problem is rendered moot when competitor Hooli offers him a three-year contract at $600,000 per year, unaware that he brings nothing to the table.

Continue at http://www.eremedia.com/sourcecon/getting-your-sourced-candidates-ready-to-interview/?utm_source=email&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=SocialWarfare


The Career Summary – What, Why and How?

May 11th, 2016 by Staff

As it is the key to every job application, there’s a lot riding on your resume.  In many cases it’s the only thing a hiring manager will look at, and even so, not for very long. When crafted well a resume can give a great perspective of your employment history, from where you have worked, to your accomplishments within each company. Ideally, it will reveal the skills you’ve attained.  The difficult part in crafting a resume is finding a way to translate what you have done already into a demonstration of what you could bring to the table. Adding a career summary to your resume is a great means to do just that.

First of all, what is a career summary?

A career summary is brief introduction that is meant to convey your personal skill set. View it as a place to showcase how you are unique. What combination of skills and experiences makes you an asset? What can you provide that no one else can?

Read more at http://theundercoverrecruiter.com/career-summary-resume/?utm_source=UR+Recap+05%2F05%2F2016&utm_campaign=URRecap+05%2F05%2F2016&utm_medium=email

 


2015 Awards are presented…

May 6th, 2016 by Staff

Connect with a winning team!  Genie Matthews and Associates is very proud to announce recruiter and company awards for 2015.

Sr Recruiters,  GENIE MATTHEWS and JANET KING,  have both secured places in the NPAWorldwide Board of Directors’ Top 25 Recruiters of 2015 list this year.  Each will receive a plaque and a check for their hard work.  Great job Genie and Janet!

Genie Matthews & Associates, Inc.  collectively, was also recognized by NPAWorldwide as one of the Top 25 Revenue Achievement agencies for 2015 and was recognized in the #9 spot in the  IPA Agency Awards for 2015.


What the Smartest Candidates ask in Job Interviews

May 4th, 2016 by Staff

More stressful than Christmas shopping. More necessary than a Netflix account. The interview — to many, the most evil necessity.

For those who aren’t so inclined, the interview process feels like running against the wind — with an open parachute strapped to your back. But, for livelihood’s sake, we must be successful in interviews. Although interviews are primarily employers asking you questions and you giving your best answers, the questions that you ask can sway the interview as much as the answers that you give.

Here are some questions to ask to help you show your interviewers that you have what it takes. Just remember that the interview is a two-way street — you are interviewing the company as much as they are interviewing you. If you join their team, it should be in a mutually beneficial relationship.

1. Why is your company a good fit for me?

This question is spunky, so know your audience well before asking. It shows that you aren’t desperate and willing to settle for any job. You refuse to undersell yourself — you have something valuable to offer and you know how much you are worth. You want to grow and develop, and interviewers love to see that.

2. Why do you (the interviewer) like this company?

This puts them on the spot (now they can share in your pain). It also gives you the chance to learn from an insider’s perspective what is good about the company.

3. What don’t you like about this company (what is this company’s greatest flaw)?

This is another really gutsy question that should be used cautiously. I wouldn’t expect a very candid answer — most interviewers would want to remain politically correct and won’t be too honest. But, it gives you a chance to take control of the interview, and it can you show some insightful flaws in the company.

4. Do you see yourself staying with this company for a while?

This gives you an idea of the quality of employees and the company — does this company hire “keepers,” and does it keep the good hires around? Is this a transitional job, or a good career choice?

5. What are the top three traits that your best employees have in common?

This question should give you a glimpse into what the company would expect from you, and the kind of people who would thrive there. If they mention traits other than yours, don’t necessarily take this as an ultimate red flag — no company can operate with only one specific personality type; maybe they need what you have. But, this does give you a good indication of whether or not this would be a job that is up your alley.

6. What are the company’s highest goals for this year?

This question gives you an idea of the direction and ambition for the company. What are their goals? Are they something you can rally behind? Can you contribute to making those goals a reality? You don’t want to join a team half-heartedly. Half-hearted doesn’t stand out. Half-hearted doesn’t climb the business ladder because you aren’t fully engaged. Find a business whose goals you can get behind 110%.

7. How many employees have been brought in by other employees?

This question can give you an idea of the work environment. And the work environment is a significant factor in the quality of your work experience. Do people like it enough to bring their friends on board? If so, it’s probably a pleasant environment.

8. What would you expect from me in the first 90 days?

What better way to find out the company’s expectations, should they hire you, than to just ask directly! This shows initiative and interest in performing well. It also helps you be prepared, if you should get the job, to jump in with confidence.

Original Post found at http://www.lifehack.org/330328/8-insightful-questions-only-the-smartest-candidates-ask-job-interview?ref=e