Forbes has honored Genie Matthews and Associates

May 26th, 2017 by Staff

Forbes has announced the first ever Best Executive Search Firms in the U.S., and Genie Matthews & Associates is one of these incredible firms! Forbes collaborated Statista to release this first annual, highly exclusive America’s Best Executive Search Firms 2017 List.

The U.S. is chock-full of Executive Search firms, and they all claim expertise, but only the greatest have the right to be called one of Forbes America’s Best.   Connect with us today and see what we can do for you.

Read more or see the full list here:  https://www.forbes.com/best-executive-recruiting-firms/list/#tab:overall.


Genie Matthews & Associates named in NPA’s Top 25 Firms for 2016

April 17th, 2017 by Staff

One of the highlights of the NPA Global Conference each year is recognizing the top-performing firms and recruiters within the network and this year was no exception. In addition to presenting the Chairman’s Award, the Top 25 Firms were recognized.  Genie Matthews & Associates  ranked #16 in overall rankings among hundreds of firms, continuing a long standing tradition of placing within the Top 25 Firms of this prestigious network of recruiting affiliates.   Let our experience work for you!  Contact us today.


2015 Awards are presented…

May 6th, 2016 by Staff

Connect with a winning team!  Genie Matthews and Associates is very proud to announce recruiter and company awards for 2015.

Sr Recruiters,  GENIE MATTHEWS and JANET KING,  have both secured places in the NPAWorldwide Board of Directors’ Top 25 Recruiters of 2015 list this year.  Each will receive a plaque and a check for their hard work.  Great job Genie and Janet!

Genie Matthews & Associates, Inc.  collectively, was also recognized by NPAWorldwide as one of the Top 25 Revenue Achievement agencies for 2015 and was recognized in the #9 spot in the  IPA Agency Awards for 2015.


Top 10 Reasons to Call a Professional Recruiter

August 27th, 2015 by Staff

By Dave Nerz

I am a pretty independent and resourceful person. I like a good challenge. I am willing to try almost anything once. Maybe you are the same?

So when something breaks in my house, I will give it go and try to fix it myself. The air conditioner went out last week and I gave it a try. Flipping breakers, replacing filters, oiling fans, etc. No success. The feedback was pretty immediate, no cold air meant sleeping in a house that was near 85 degrees Fahrenheit, so fairly hot and uncomfortable for Michigan. Time to call a professional. Next day, the HVAC professional got us back on the path to cool air and comfortable sleeping.

When tax time comes around, I could do it myself for home, but the business is too important to mess with the do-it-yourself models. We are in business for reasons other than doing the taxes…that is something a professional needs to do. If I get a letter that requires legal review and attention, a professional is called in to help. Professionals serve a purpose and frequently do things better, more effectively and with less negative consequence than going it alone.

So what does this have to do with recruitment? These are tough times to find and attract qualified talent. So why are so many using employers using homegrown, do-it-yourself, and internal methods? Maybe independent recruiters need to better explain the value they deliver. Or perhaps being a professional recruiter is so easy anyone can do it?

Here are some reasons I think using a professional recruiter makes more sense than homegrown methods of recruiting.:

Top 10 Reasons to Call a Professional Recruiter

10. Hiring a recruiter keeps you focused on your core business.

9. Recruiters know employment law. One false move on your own could cost you way more than what you might save on a fee.

8. Recruiters can engage candidates that you cannot. For example, the best talent at a competitive business.

7. Your time is worth money. Your time and your staff time is not free.

6. Missing opportunities to get the right candidate can be very costly.

5. Recruiters will make you define the job requirements in a clear and accurate way. This gives you a higher likelihood of retaining top talent. People leave because the job was not what they were told it was.

4. Recruiters will find talent for you for years into the future once you have them on your radar. They may locate a talented candidate that is a super fit in your organization two years after a targeted search is completed.

3. Recruiters will help reduce the time to hire. Open positions are costing you money. Filling openings quicker saves you money.

2. Recruiters can negotiate salary, benefits and details less emotionally and with greater likelihood of success than you can directly.

And the number one reason you should hire a professional recruiter is:

1. A recruiter can make you money – if a professional recruiter finds even one significant candidate you might have missed on your own, or better yet, brings you a talented candidate long after a specific search is done, that candidate can drive thousands of dollars of profit to your bottom line over a 10-, 20- or 30-year career.

When it comes to attracting and retaining key talent, can you afford the homegrown, in-house method versus the use of a professional recruiter?

Read the original article:  http://npaworldwide.com/blog/2015/08/18/top-10-reasons-to-call-a-professional-recruiter/


How to Get Great Job References

August 19th, 2015 by Staff

You’re this close to landing a new gig, and your potential boss has asked for references. You jot down a few names, assuming it’s a formality. Mistake. Those references can make or break you: Approximately two out of three employers said they have changed their mind about a candidate after speaking with a reference, according to a 2012 survey by the job-search site CareerBuilder.com. Next time, remember these guidelines.

Don’t Blindside Your References by Listing Their Names Without Telling Them

Be sure to tell anyone you might list as a reference what job you’re applying for in advance, says Mary Ellen Slayter, a career expert at the job-search site Monster.com. Then make sure she wants to vouch for you. Ask, “Do you feel you can provide a strong reference for me in that role?” You want to make sure your reference is willing to say good things about you and can visualize you in this specific job. If she is unenthusiastic or voices concern about whether you’re right for the position, go to someone else.

Do Coach Your References

People are busy, so don’t assume they can recall that killer sales presentation that you did three years ago or that time you brought in two new clients in a week. Offer to help prep your reference by e-mailing details of your recent career achievements. “Make it easy by mentioning a few key skills and projects,” says Jaime Klein, the president of Inspire Human Resources, a consulting firm in New York City. The better you prepare your references, she says, the more willing they will be to help.

Don’t Assume the Employer Will Limit Its Check to the Names You Provided

Companies can call anyone you’ve ever worked with to ask about you. You have no control over what these people say, but that’s all the more reason to make sure that your own references sing your praises, says Abby Kohut, a career consultant who runs {{AbsolutelyAbby.com, a career-advice site. When choosing your references, think executives and direct supervisors, not cubicle mates. But don’t list bigwigs so high up the ladder that they barely remember you. You don’t want a potential boss to think that you’re forgettable

 

Read the entire article here:  http://www.realsimple.com/work-life/life-strategies/job-career/job-references


What are you waiting for? Push the EASY button.

July 29th, 2015 by Staff

The chemical industry is HOT!  If you have thought about a new position lately, now is the time to look.   We have great companies in need of qualified chemical engineers, electrical and maintenance engineers and a variety of related positions in the chemical and food processing industries.  Great opportunities are available from coast to coast.     Easy online application system or connect with us today and get started on your new career.  Genie Matthews & Associates brings decades of experience and a worldwide network of affiliated sources to your next job search.


GMA welcomes Dave Payleitner, engineering and technical recruiter!

June 22nd, 2015 by Staff

Dave brings a combined 25 years of successful engineering and technical recruitment experience within the refining, petrochemical, specialty chemical, telecommunications, manufacturing and EH&S markets.  He was previously an on-site RPO Sr. Recruiter for Honeywell’s UOP subsidiary, an international supplier of process technology, products and engineering services to the refining, petrochemical, gas processing and bio-renewable energy industries located in Des Plaines, IL.  Dave has also worked as a Sr. Recruiter with Motorola supporting the corporation’s Mobile Devices, Cellular Infrastructure and Enterprise Communications business units and also as a Sr. Recruitment Consultant in the retained search and research recruitment arenas. Put Dave’s expertise to work for you today. Contact him at dave@gmarecruiters.com or 847-736-2661.


Genie Matthews & Associates Honored by Global Recruiting Network

April 29th, 2015 by Staff

NPAworldwide, a member-owned, global recruiting network, has announced its 2014 award winners. Awards are based on placement revenue earned during the calendar year. Genie Matthews & Associates is honored to place at #12 in the Top 25 Firms in NPA Revenue. In individual production, Genie Matthews was also recognized for overall recruiter production by placing #8 in Recruiter Awards for NPA Production.

“Congratulations to Genie Matthews & Associates for their excellent results in 2014,” said president Dave Nerz. He added, “To be recognized among the top five percent of NPAworldwide members globally is a phenomenal achievement, especially since NPAworldwide split placement activity is only a portion of overall recruitment activity.”

About NPAworldwide. NPAworldwide is a recruitment network facilitating placements between its members. The network has nearly 500 member offices with 1,300 recruiters across 6 continents. For more information, please visit www.npaworldwide.com or www.npaworldwideworks.com.


Welcome to Sara Freeman-Smith

April 23rd, 2015 by Staff

Genie Matthews & Associates welcomes Sara Freeman Smith – Senior Recruiter. Sara joins GMA with over 25 years of professional recruiting and staffing experience gained in the oil and gas, petrochemicals, agricultural chemicals, financial services and staffing industries. Sara started her career as a staffing account manager and has worked in corporate recruiting and as a contract corporate consultant . Most recently, she provides full cycle recruiting support for specialty chemical manufacturing plants in all areas from plant management to technicians . She enjoys working EHS, HR, Supply Chain & Project Management/Engineering roles.  Put Sara’s expertise to work for you today. Contact her at sara@gmarecruiters.com or 281-886-7781.


After the Interview – the next step

January 23rd, 2015 by Staff
10 Things to Do After the Job Interview
{Click on the title above to read the original article on Next Avenue.}

Congrats. You had the job interview. Now, your work is done, right? Wrong.

In today’s hypercompetitive job market, effective follow-up after the interview is a must and failing to do it well might cause you to lose out to another candidate.

The line between being persistent and being a pain, however, is blurry at best. So to help you sort things out, I sent a query to my colleagues in the careers world — recruiters, career coaches, hiring managers and CEO’s — asking for their best follow-up advice.

I received more than 60 responses on topics ranging from thank you notes to handling rejection. Here’s a summary of their 10 best tips:

The Thank-You Note

On this point, everyone agreed: A thank-you note is a must. Most of the pros recommended you send one via email within 24 hours of the interview. Several suggested a handwritten card as a supplement when a personal or creative touch might be especially valued.

But if you really want to stand out, you need to do more than just say “thanks for your time.” The experts suggested these techniques to make your thank-you note shine:

Reference an article of interest. Include in the note a relevant article, link or book recommendation relating to a topic that was discussed during the interview. It’s a value-add for the interviewer and will reinforce your industry expertise.

To really make an impact, Jene Kapela, a South Florida-based leadership coach, says you should write a blog post on a topic discussed during the interview and then share the link to the post in your thank-you note.

Include supporting documentation that illustrates your ability to do the job. You don’t want to overwhelm the interviewer, but adding one or two carefully-curated examples of your work (non-confidential work samples, press mentions, etc.) can be a smart way to show off your expertise.

“It helps show you are the real deal,” says Tyson J. Spring, head of New Business & Strategy for Elever Professional, an Austin, Texas recruiting firm.

Provide a follow-up response to one of the key interview questions. Ever draw a blank or give a less than stellar response during a job interview? Use your note to modify, correct or amplify one of your responses.

Todd Cherches, CEO of BigBlueGumball, a New York City-based management consulting and coaching firm, offers this example:

When you asked me about my single greatest accomplishment in my last job, I apologize that I drew a blank. However, immediately after leaving, it hit me that I should have mentioned I was voted the top salesperson in my department for 2013, and proudly received a special recognition award at my company’s year-end national convention.

The Waiting Game

Anyone who has recently looked for a job knows that hiring decisions can drag on for months. To make that in-between-time work in your favor….

Follow instructions. If the recruiter or interviewer suggested contacting them by email, don’t call on the phone. And, says Lynne Sarikas, Director of the MBA Career Center at the D’Amore McKim School of Business at Northeastern University, “If they tell you it will take two weeks, wait the two weeks.”

If you forgot to ask about next steps during the interview, request clarification in your follow-up e-mail. Then follow the instructions you receive.

Don’t be a stalker. While you’re understandably anxious, that doesn’t give you license to pester the employer.

Debra Manente, Associate Director of Career Services at Post University in Waterbury, Conn., says you should call the recruiter or hiring manager to follow up at their recommended time (leave a message if you don’t reach them). But if you haven’t heard back after two calls, “take it as a sign to move on,” she says.

And speaking of stalking, most of the pros advised holding off on sending LinkedIn invitations to the people who interviewed you until after the hiring process has ended.

Immediately begin prepping for the next round of interviews. You never know when you’ll be asked to come in for a Round 2, so you’ll want to be good to go at a moment’s notice.

Joe Weinlick, Vice President of Marketing for the online job board network, Beyond.com, recommends that you “dig deep to find interesting pieces of information that most people can’t find on the company’s website. It could be about an award-winning project, a milestone in the company’s history or a recent initiative. If you take this information and casually work it into the conversation in a follow-up interview, it will leave a positive lasting impression and increase your chances of getting the job.”

Call in a favor. Have an influential contact who knows the hiring manager or recruiter you met with? Now might be the time to ask that person to lend a hand.

Maria Goldsholl, Chief Operating Officer of the Mom Corps staffing solutions agency, offers this advice: “Have an impressive reference reach out to the hiring manager or recruiter via LinkedIn to drop a note to praise you. The note could read: ‘Mary, I recently became aware that Josh was interviewing with your company for a position. I wanted to tell you that you would be very lucky to have someone like that on your team. His skills are sharp and he was one of the best employees I have ever had.’

Keep hope — while you keep looking. In today’s crazy job market, you never know when you might hear back about a position you’ve long forgotten about.

As Lisa M. Benson, Staffing Director at Mary Kraft Staffing & HR Solutions, points out, “Thanks to electronics, hiring managers do really keep resumes at their fingertips for a while when they like them. We hear stories of candidates being hired six months to a year after the initial submission of their resume, sometimes with very little contact in the interim!”

Of course, hope alone is not a job search strategy. So keep your search in high gear until you have an offer in hand.

If You Don’t Get the Job

Should you lose out for a position you interviewed for, accept rejection in a professional manner. Sure it hurts to hear “No.” But if you handle the rejection professionally, you might be considered for a future job at the same employer.

Carol Cochran, Director of Human Resources at FlexJobs, shared that in the last six months, she has returned to — and hired — five candidates she originally turned down. “They made a great impression in our first round of conversations and were graceful in their communications after I let them know we had chosen another applicant,” Cochran wrote to me.

Stay in touch. You never know when an employer might have another opening or will hear of an opening and recommend you, so remain in contact after losing out. You might use LinkedIn to send an article or to reach out with a helpful suggestion.

But Bruce Hurwitz, a New York City-based executive recruiter, career counselor and author, says: Don’t overdo it. “Once every few months is a good idea,” he notes.

Otherwise, you might be seen as a pest, and that’s no way to stand out among job candidates as one of the best.